The Real Breakfast at Tiffany's

photo: courtesy tiffany & co.


to warm-up our eyes preparing them to enjoy this visual, appetite-appealing story, let's Celebrate the style & elegance of Blake Edwards (1922 - 2010), with the famous opening scene of Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961). Blake Edwards, Audrey Hepburn (wearing Givenchy) & Henri Mancini. Comedies don't get more perfect than this.


The year: 1961. The classic, iconic scene: Holly Golightly gently glides out of a yellow cab, elegantly dressed in a black Givenchy dress. Around her neck is a startling stack of pearls. Thick black sunglasses cover her expressive eyes. She sips coffee and nibbles on a Danish, peering at the display window of Tiffany’s. In this moment, an icon is born.

the Oscar-winning film Breakfast at Tiffany’s quickly became a classic, praised particularly for its star, the glamorous Audrey Hepburn. and her chic, oft-imitated style—guided by the sharp eyes of Hubert de Givenchy and legendary costume designer Edith Head.


A dream coming true in blue

It’s Holly Golightly’s dream come true: Tiffany & Co.’s flagship Fifth Avenue store is opening a cafe this coming friday, november 10, where one can breakfast (and lunch) at Tiffany’s. 

design: courtesy tiffany & co.

Blue Box Cafe will be serving American food and tea service in a room dripping in Tiffany trademarked unique robin's egg blue

picked by Charles Lewis Tiffany for the cover of the company's first catalog, or "Blue Book." According to the company, he may have selected the color because turquoise was a popular gemstone at the time. Today the color is not only trademarked (it has been since 1998), it also has its own custom Pantone number: 1837, the year the company was founded.

photo: courtesy tiffany & co.


A REAL BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S

photo: courtesy tiffany & co.

in The Blue Box Café you will be enjoying a real breakfast at tiffany's. the café is tucked into the fourth floor at 727 Fifth Avenue, part of a wholly renovated space that showcases a luxury home and accessories collection, the first major project from Reed Krakoff, who became the company’s chief artistic officer in January.

The space includes Krakoff’s Everyday Objects, like walnut ping-pong paddles with black and blue leather faces and unfussy “paper cups” fussily rendered in bone china, reports vanity fair. The renovated floor, which one moves through to get to the café, is clearly aimed at a younger patron. Gone is all the masculine wood paneling and stately dark marble (though they remain on the three floors below). In their place is light marble and white walls, full of nooks for exploring and eminently Instagrammable whimsy.

Yet Another Reason To Visit Our New Fourth Floor, And We Hope It Will Draw Customers Up To Experience The Artfully Composed Home Of Tiffany’s New Luxury Home And Accessories Collection Of Elevated Everyday Objects.
— Richard Moore, Tiffany & Co.'s Vice President Creative Director Overseeing All Things Store And Window Design

10 Things You Never Knew About Breakfast at Tiffany's

audrey hepburn, the belgian actress who starred breakfast at tiffany's

Audrey Hepburn, The Belgian actress starred in 28 films over the course of her career, but none of her roles was more famous than Holly Golightly in Breakfast at Tiffany’s. The 1961 Truman Capote adaptation turned eating a pastry while window-shopping into a whimsical rite of passage and is forever synonymous with the generously browed actress.

1

photo: gettyimages

Truman Capote wanted Marilyn Monroe to play the role of Holly Golightly."She was Truman Capote's first choice,” Sam Wasson, author of Fifth Avenue, 5 A.M.: Audrey Hepburn, ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s,’ has said. “Another thing you may not know: Marilyn didn't take the part in part because Paula Strasberg, her advisor and acting coach, said she should not be playing a lady of the evening." Capote, author of the 1958 novella, was reportedly very disappointed that the studio went with Hepburn, saying, “Paramount double-crossed me in every way and cast Audrey.”


2

Audrey Hepburn’s dress was designed especially for her.Hubert de Givenchy designed the famous black dress in 1961 for Audrey Hepburn’s turn as Holly Golightly. After Hepburn’s death in 1993, Givenchy donated the black satin gown to City of Joy Aid, and in 2006 the dress was auctioned off at Christie’s for more than $900,000.


3

Despite the famous shot, Hepburn didn’t care much for Danish.According to a 1960 New York Times report, “Miss Hepburn, it developed, had no affection for the Danish, preferring ice cream at Schrafft’s.”

Photo: Courtesy of Jurow-Shepherd


4

holly golightly's apartment, located on east 72nd street in manhattan, new york

Holly Golightly’s apartment went on sale in 2011.While the interiors of Holly’s apartment were reportedly shot on a Paramount sound stage, the famous façade is very much in scene. Located on East Seventy-first Street in Manhattan (just a stone’s throw from Tiffany’s flagship), the townhouse, which features three bedrooms and a solarium, was listed for $5.85 million.


5

Photo: Everett Collection

You can buy Holly’s famous shades.Some have mistaken Hepburn’s oversize glasses for Ray-Bans, but they’re actually made by Oliver Goldsmith. In 2011, the sunglasses were rereleased for the 50th anniversary of the film, and can now be had for $440.


6

The role of Paul Varjak was originally offered to Steve McQueen. Breakfast at Tiffany’s director Blake Edwards reportedly wanted Steve McQueen to play Audrey Hepburn’s paramour. McQueen was interested in the part, but his commitment to the series Wanted: Dead or Alive precluded him from accepting the role that would inevitably go to George Peppard.

Photo: (from left) Getty Images; Photofest Digital


7

Photo: Courtesy of Jurow-Shepherd

Fred Flintstone had a role in Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Alan Reed, who played the incarcerated mobster Sally Tomato in the film, was best known as the original voice of The Flintstones’s patriarch.


8

Photo: Everett Collection

Mickey Rooney’s performance as Mr. Yunioshi has not stood the test of time.Mickey Rooney’s portrayal of the Japanese character Mr. Yunioshi has faced an increasing backlash over the years. In 2008, a Sacramento screening of the film was canceled due to protests of Rooney’s offensive caricature. “They hired me to do this overboard, and we had fun doing it,” Rooney said at the time. “Never in all the more than 40 years after we made it—not one complaint. Every place I've gone in the world people say, ‘God, you were so funny.’"


9

Paramount wanted to remove the movie’s famous track, “Moon River.”After a preview screening of the film, Paramount executive Martin Rackin reportedly said that he wanted the song, composed by Henry Mancini and written by Johnny Mercer, to be removed. Legend has it that the normally mild-mannered Hepburn responded with “over my dead body.” The song would go on to win the Academy Award for Best Original Song.Photo: Getty Images


10

Photo: Everett Collection

Breakfast at Tiffany’s marked the first time Tiffany’s had been used as a film location.The titular jewelry shop was reportedly “grateful for the kind words and free publicity.” During filming, however, the store assembled 40 guards and sales clerks to protect the jewels inside. Even though, as Holly says, “Nothing very bad could happen to you there.”


a beautiful clip & a beautiful song


have breakfast at blue box café & your own personal film


KEEP DREAMING


LIKE & SHARE